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Viewing entries from category: Comedy

Shaun of the Dead Single Film Study »

Viki Walden | Friday September 15, 2017

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Directors, Edgar Wright, Non-Hollywood Films, Shaun of the Dead, Genres & Case Studies, Comedy, Horror

YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/embed/LIfcaZ4pC-4

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Eduqas Film Studies Paper 1

Section B: British Film Since 1995 Two Film Study
Component Group 1: Varieties of Film and Filmmaking

These tasks require you study all films with particular reference to responding to questions in the key areas:

  • Film...
[ read full article ] »

WJEC AS Film FM2 British and American Film Sec A Producers and Audiences: The Inbetweeners »

Rob Miller | Tuesday September 22, 2015

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section A: Producers and Audiences, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Directors, Ben Palmer, Non-Hollywood Films, The Inbetweeners, Genres & Case Studies, Comedy

Independent Film Case Study: The Inbetweeners Movie (Palmer, 2011)

This resource focuses on one crossover independent film, The Inbetweeners Movie. It is intended to be used as stimulus in helping to understand the definitions of independent film. For a full guide on Section A please access WJEC AS FM2 British & American Film Producers and Audiences Resource Items.

The Inbetweeners Movie (Inbetweeners) from 2011 crosses over from independent to mainstream film even in title: the name having connotations that it is neither one thing or the other with four stereotypically...

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OCR AS Film Studies Contemporary English Language Film: Gone Too Far! and Sightseers »

Rob Miller | Friday September 11, 2015

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR AS, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Gone Too Far!, Sightseers, Genres & Case Studies, Adventure, Comedy, Crime, Drama

This resource will be studying the seven frameworks for analysis in Gone Too Far (2014) and Sightseers (2012). It is not an exemplar. For a breakdown of exam requirements, please go to AS OCR Film Studies: Contemporary English Language Film or locate our extended Section A Exemplar Response, using The Double and Saving Mr. Banks, both from 2013.

Gone Too Far!

Authorship

Gone Too Far! (GTF) is a British-Nigerian comedy/social realist drama directed by Destiny Ekaragha. She is only the third black British woman to have directed a feature length film that received UK...

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OCR A2 Film Sec A Messages and Values in Global Film: Battleship Potemkin & Good Bye, Lenin! »

Rob Miller | Friday September 11, 2015

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR A2, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Goodbye Lenin, World Cinema, Battleship Potemkin, Genres & Case Studies, Comedy, Drama, History, Romance, War

  • Battleship Potemkin (Russia, 1925)
  • Good Bye, Lenin! (Germany, 2003)

Battleship Potemkin

  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNT6xyopdBs (whole film)

Historical, Socio-political and Cultural Issues incorporating Authorship

Battleship Potemkin (Potemkin) is a film rooted in Russian history, a fragile peasant economy was ruled by a Tsarist autocracy until revolution and war in 1905 saw a wave of mass political and social unrest spread through the Russian Empire. This included strikes, peasant unrest and military mutinies. It was the latter that Potemkin explored by...

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British Film: Swinging Britain 1963-1973 »

Rob Miller | Thursday November 06, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section B: British Film Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Alfie, If, Genres & Case Studies, Comedy, Drama, Hot Entries

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FM2 Section B: British Film Topics – British Film and Culture

When we use the term ’British film and culture’ we are stating, or at least implying a connection between specific films and how they are partly, and in significant ways the product of a wider national cultural discourse and identity. In this context, a film can contribute to the way that a nation communicates messages and values about itself. In terms of film, these messages and values find expression in both the micro and macro elements of a film narrative.

In this resource...

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International Film Styles: Surrealism »

Rob Miller | Friday September 19, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section A: World Cinema, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Directors, Louis Bunuel, World Cinema, The Discreet Charms of the Bourgeoisie, Un Chien Andalou, Genres & Case Studies, Comedy, Fantasy, Silent, Surrealism, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

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Sample Questions

  • How far does cinematic style support themes and ideas in the films you have studied for this topic?
  • Discuss how far the development of your chosen international film style can be seen as the work of particular creative individuals?
  • Discuss characteristic features of casting and/or performance, exploring how far these features contribute the overall effect of the films you have studied.
  • What is the relationship between visual style and the subject matter of the films you have studied?

WJEC Say

“This topic focuses on the...

[ read full article ] »

Modern Times Case Study (Chaplin 1936) »

James Clarke | Monday May 19, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section C: Single Film Critical Study, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, Modern Times, Genres & Case Studies, Comedy, Drama, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

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The first image that we see in Modern Times is of a clock - a symbol of the workplace and productivity as Chaplin’s Little Tramp struggles in the modern, industrialised world of which he is so critical during the time of the Great Depression, see more on that here. As such the image is emblematic of the entire film. Modern Times is a silent film comedy that is as ideologically rich and meaningful as a wide range of far more ‘serious’ dramas about ‘serious’ subjects; as evidenced by films such as Schindler’s List (1993) and 12 Years A...

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WJEC A2 FM4 Section C Single Film Critical Study | Talk To Her - Almodovar, 2002 »

James Clarke | Friday May 09, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section A: World Cinema, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, World Cinema, Talk To Her, Genres & Case Studies, Comedy, Drama, Romance, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

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In this resource we will consider the film Talk To Her (2002) and explore some aspects of its film style, by which we mean the choices made by the filmmakers in their deployment of sound and visual elements in the construction of the narrative. As such, we are considering how storytelling devices express a range of meanings and values embodied within the drama. Talk To Her offers an opportunity for us to think about how film (and non Hollywood films, particularly) might have more opportunity than the Hollywood-produced film (typically conservative...

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WJEC AS Film Studies FM2 Exemplar »

Rob Miller | Tuesday March 11, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section B: British Film Topics, Genres & Case Studies, British Film, Comedy, Hot Entries

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Resource Material


Study the items in Part A of the resource material for use with Section A Question 1.

Item 1: Newspaper article: ‘British cinema is booming
’

British cinema is booming

You have only got to listen to Jonathan Ross when interviewing British film actors – the British Film Industry is booming.

  • British films such as 12 Years a Slave, Gravity, Philomena and Skyfall have been winning awards and achieving critical and commercial success all around the world.
  • Two of the top-grossing films at the UK box office this year are...
[ read full article ] »

British Film and Genre (Horror and Comedy) »

Rob Miller | Wednesday December 04, 2013

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section B: British Film Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Censorship & Regulation, Copyright & Licensing, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Production Companies, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, 28 Days Later, Non-Hollywood Films, Four Lions, Genres & Case Studies, British Film, Comedy, Horror, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

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The British Film Industry is successful and thriving but as Jill Nelmes identified in An Introduction to Film Studies can be defined on a number or levels and by a range of “disparate films, genres and movements”. In addition to this there are arguments over what is a British Film and as such, there have been many attempts to define British Film over the years. A useful definition that the BFI proposed in 1996 was that films could be described and culturally and/or institutionally British e.g. commercially successful British Films like the...

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Film and Thatcher’s Britain »

James Clarke | Tuesday December 03, 2013

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section B: British Film Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Censorship & Regulation, Copyright & Licensing, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, Chariots of Fire, Non-Hollywood Films, My Beautiful Laundrette, Genres & Case Studies, Comedy, Drama, History, Romance, Sport, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

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One of the key issues to be explored in our study of film is that of representation. As such, it’s fair to say that there’s an established, and largely agreed upon, understanding that film, like other media and forms of cultural expression, can reflect back to us aspects of the conditions in which we live or have lived with. Certainly, there’s scope for us to think about how British cinema has, in more or less ‘obvious’ ways, reflected back to us a point of view about a particular British Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher, and the period...

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WJEC A2 Film Studies FM4 Section B Spectatorship Documentaries Exemplar »

Karen Ardouin | Monday June 10, 2013

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Fahrenheit 9/11, Grizzly Man, Marley, Senna, Super Size Me, Touching The Void, We Are The Lambeth Boys, Genres & Case Studies, Adventure, Biography, Comedy, Documentary, Drama, History, Independent, Music, Sport, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Mock Exams, A Level Mock Exams

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With reference to the films you have studied for this topic, how far can it be said that different kinds of documentaries offer different kinds of spectator experiences?

The spectator experience is dependent on a number of factors including environment of reception for example (where it is seen) and specifically purpose, whether to entertain, inform, educate or persuade. Documentaries are diverse in content and can suggest degrees of realism. Mediated content is often apparent in terms of the selection and construction of material or a wholly...

[ read full article ] »

Popular Film & Emotional Response: Understanding Emotional Responses »

Viki Walden | Monday March 25, 2013

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, Schindler's List, Non-Hollywood Films, World Cinema, La Vita è Bella, Genres & Case Studies, Action, Biography, Comedy, Crime, Drama, History, Romance, Science Fiction, Thriller, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

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Students can find studying spectatorship challenging.  There are many theories of spectatorship, but starting with the theory can lead students to list theoretical ideas rather than engage with the texts. Let’s not forget this A2 Film Studies unit is about “emotional responses” more than critical ones.

This is a good place to start with students. What is “emotion”? What is “popular film”? And what elements of the film experience trigger emotional responses?

Emotion and Popular Film

The term emotion, as commonly used today, has...

[ read full article ] »

Submarine Case Study »

Rob Miller | Monday October 01, 2012

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR AS, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Genres & Case Studies, British Film, Comedy, Drama, Romance, Hot Entries

Institutional Factors | Distribution

Submarine was written and directed by Richard Ayoade and released at UK cinemas in March 2011 after significant critical success at festivals including the London Film Festival (LFF) but particularly the Toronto Film Festival. Toronto success secured the film a distribution contract with the Weinstein Company (formerly Disney owned Miramax) – Bob and Harvey Weinstein’s company in essence can be described as a ‘Mini Major’ film distributor, large enough to cope with the distribution of academy award winning The Artist (2012) and...

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Student Example of Micro Analysis | High Level Work »

Rob Miller | Monday October 01, 2012

Categories: GCSE, WJEC GCSE, Analysis, Film Analysis, Micro Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, Your Highness, Genres & Case Studies, Action Adventure, Adventure, Comedy, Fantasy, Hot Entries

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Associated Resources

  • GCSE Film Studies Micro Analysis A* Grade Example.doc



AS OCR Film Studies: Contemporary English Language Film »

Nicole Ponsford | Tuesday September 11, 2012

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR AS, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Hot Fuzz, The Woman in Black, Genres & Case Studies, Action, British Film, Comedy, Drama, Horror, Independent, Mystery, Thriller, Hot Entries

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In both the exam and in the coursework, candidates will be asked to study English Language Texts. They are NOT able to study the same texts for both sections and will prepare for this in different ways. For example, the coursework will act as a catalyst for their creative work in their portfolios. In the exam, students will have part of a two hour exam to answer a specific (unseen) question on an aspect of the film.

Both the coursework and examination texts will have shared aspects. This is mainly the understanding of both the micro and macro features of a text. It is...

[ read full article ] »

Kick Ass Case Study »

Nicole Ponsford | Wednesday November 16, 2011

Categories: GCSE, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, Kick Ass, Genres & Case Studies, Action, Action Adventure, British Film, Comedy, Independent, Superhero, Hot Entries

Paper 1 | Superhero Films Case Study | Kick Ass

Synopsis

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Dave Lizewski (Aaron Johnson) is Kick Ass. The film begins with his voiceover about superheroes and the story of his life. Six months ago, he was “the last person you would expect to be a superhero”. He is an American student who doesn’t belong to any clubs, “invisible to girls“, he fantasises about his English teacher and has a crush on Katie Deauxma, a cute girl who has a locker near his. His mother died 18 months ago of an aneurysm, and he lives with his dad. Instead of following the normal superhero codes...

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Shaun Of The Dead Screening and Research Questions »

Nicole Ponsford | Thursday November 10, 2011

Categories: GCSE, Analysis, Film Analysis, Screening Notes, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Shaun of the Dead, Genres & Case Studies, British Film, Comedy, Horror, Independent, Hot Entries, Research, Film Research

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Associated Resources

Shaun of the Dead Screening and Research Questions.doc

  1. Who directed, produced and distributed Shaun of the Dead?
  2. How does the film reflect the pattern of many British Films of recent years?
  3. Research and detail at least ten films made by the same production company and distributor. Identify their genre
  4. Why do you think Shaun of the Dead was commercially successful? Research the UK and US box office gross and subsequent DVD/Video sales
  5. How does the film culturally represent the image of a nation? How does this compare with independent films you are...
[ read full article ] »

Wallace and Gromit: The Wrong Trousers Case Study »

Viki Walden | Thursday November 10, 2011

Categories: Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Wallace and Gromit, Genres & Case Studies, Animation, 1990 Onwards, British Film, Comedy, Crime, Independent, Hot Entries, CCEA, CCEA Case Studies

Synopsis

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It is Gromit’s birthday and he is feeling particularly ignored by Wallace. When the post arrives, he eagerly seeks it out but find a rather tacky and unoriginal card ‘To a dear dog’ from Wallace and nothing else. Wallace presses his alarm for breakfast and reminds Gromit that it is his turn for breakfast, so Gromit obliges. Wallace finally gives Gromit his presents, which bemuse him - a collar and lead (so he can finally look like he “belongs to someone”) and techno-trousers that can take him for walks.

Gromit goes for a walk with the techno-trousers, but...

[ read full article ] »

Shaun of the Dead Case Study »

Nicole Ponsford | Thursday November 03, 2011

Categories: A Level, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Production Companies, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Shaun of the Dead, Genres & Case Studies, British Film, Comedy, Horror, Romance, Hot Entries

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Paper 2 | Non-Hollywood Films Case Study | Shaun of the Dead

Synopsis

The Winchester, a typical London pub. Shaun (Simon Pegg), his girlfriend Liz (kate Ashfield), her two friends David (Dylan Moran) and Diane (Lucy David) are in the pub. Shaun’s best friend, the foul mouthed (and minded) overweight layabout, Ed (Nick Frost) plays the slot machines. Shaun is getting a hard time from this girlfriend; she wants to spend more time with him, be more exciting and do more than sit in The Winchester with Ed. She wants him “to live a little”.

The next morning, Shaun wakes...

[ read full article ] »

Fight Club Case Study »

Rob Miller | Monday October 31, 2011

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section C: Single Film Critical Study, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, Fight Club, Genres & Case Studies, Comedy, Drama, Film Noir, Romance, Thriller

A2 Film Studies Section C: Close Critical Study

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Synopsis and Character Profiles

Fight Club is based on a surprisingly short novel by Chuck Palahniuk, where it is suggested the desire for meaning drives civilisation. The film takes this as it essence, but offers a broader range of more complex representations.

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In terms of narrative, the film is initially about the life of a disillusioned office worker - played by the narrator, Edward Norton – he works for a car insurance company, who appraise accident damaged vehicles in terms of costing.

He finds his job boring and...

[ read full article ] »

Amélie Case Study »

Viki Walden | Monday October 31, 2011

Categories: GCSE, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Amelie, World Cinema, Genres & Case Studies, Comedy, Fantasy, Romance, Hot Entries

Paper 2 | Non-Hollywood Films Case Study | Amélie

Synopsis

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Le Fabuleux Destin d’Amélie Poulain is the story of Amélie, a young girl brought up by a strict, nervous schoolteacher and an emotionally cold doctor. The awkwardness and nervous deposition of her parents means Amélie does not meet other children; instead she is left to her own imagination.

After her mother dies, her father becomes gradually more reclusive and Amélie decides she will leave as soon as she can. Once she is working as a waitress in Paris, she leaves. When Amélie hears of Princess Diana’s death...

[ read full article ] »