Secret Examiner

Christmas Quiz

A Level Film

IB Film

Film Library

Codes & Conventions

Legacy Resources

Useful Materials

Film Studies Contemporary English Language Film: Gone Too Far! and Sightseers

Rob Miller | Friday September 11, 2015

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR AS, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Gone Too Far!, Sightseers, Genres & Case Studies, Adventure, Comedy, Crime, Drama

This resource will be studying the seven frameworks for analysis in Gone Too Far (2014) and Sightseers (2012).

Gone Too Far!

Authorship

Gone Too Far! (GTF) is a British-Nigerian comedy/social realist drama directed by Destiny Ekaragha. She is only the third black British woman to have directed a feature length film that received UK theatrical distribution (cinemas). All of her previous short films premiered at the BFI London Film Festival (LFF) while GTF premiered at LFF in October 2013 and had its theatrical release in October 2014 a year later. This was unusual but it was felt that some changes needed to be made as a result of initial feedback. It is an adaptation of a 2007 Bola Agbaje play of the same name, which was critically acclaimed at a number of theatres. Adbaje worked with Ekaragham with the help of the then UK Film Council Development Fund (now BFI) in developing the play into a film script. After the film’s release, Ekaragha was named by BAFTA as a ‘Breakthrough Brit’ and has been commissioned by BBC One since to direct a fictional autobiography of Lenny Henry’s life and also plans to shoot a Zombie film in south-east London. GTF was distributed by the UK independent Verve to exclusively London cinemas.

Genre and Narrative

GTF is primarily a comedy, which is the key appeal of the film but it is also hybridised with social realism in the same way the regional urban London films Ill Manors (2012), Sket (2011) and Shank (2010) are social realism gangster hybrids. Comedy and social realism have worked well together over the last 10 years with films like Ken Loach’s Looking for Eric (2009) expanding the sometimes limiting conventions of social realism to appeal to a broader, and in the case of GTF, younger demographic. Comedy conventions are achieved primarily through a clash of cultures with the character Yemi seen as a cool streetwise south-east London boy whose style is cramped by the arrival of his loud, obvious and...


Please subscribe or log in to access the rest of this resource (including associated media).

This website offers a wealth of enriched content to help you help your students with GCSE & A Level Film. Please subscribe or log in to access this content.

The content of this site has been produced by teachers and examiners. Edusites have similar support sites for English and Media called Edusites English and Edusites Media.

If you would like more information about Edusites Film, get in touch using the contact details below.

Kind regards, Richard Gent
Edusites Ltd

[email] admin@edusites.co.uk
[telephone] 01604 847689
[fax] 01604 843220