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Viewing entries from category: Copyright & Licensing

International Film Styles: Neorealism »

jclarke | Friday September 04, 2015

Categories: A Level, Eduqas (WJEC) A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section A: World Cinema, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film History, Cinema in Context, Film Industry, Censorship & Regulation, Copyright & Licensing, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Production Companies, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Kes, World Cinema, Rome, Open City, Genres & Case Studies, Neorealism, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

Across the varied and diverse ways in which a film text can encode and emphasise meanings and a specific viewpoint on or presentation of a subject, realism is a key aesthetic and formal choice and approach that has functioned as a key creative direction of so much western expression across literature and the visual arts. This resource, then, explores the characteristics of a particular film style that we call neorealism. It stems from post World War Two...

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British Film and Genre (Horror and Comedy) »

Rob Miller | Wednesday December 04, 2013

Categories: A Level, Eduqas (WJEC) A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section B: British Film Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Censorship & Regulation, Copyright & Licensing, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Production Companies, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, 28 Days Later, Non-Hollywood Films, Four Lions, Genres & Case Studies, British Film, Comedy, Horror, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

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The British Film Industry is successful and thriving but as Jill Nelmes identified in An Introduction to Film Studies can be defined on a number or levels and by a range of “disparate films, genres and movements?. In addition to this there are arguments over what is a British Film and as such, there have been many attempts to define British Film over the years. A useful definition that the BFI proposed in 1996 was that films...

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Film and Thatcher’s Britain »

jclarke | Tuesday December 03, 2013

Categories: A Level, Eduqas (WJEC) A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section B: British Film Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Censorship & Regulation, Copyright & Licensing, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, Chariots of Fire, Non-Hollywood Films, My Beautiful Laundrette, Genres & Case Studies, Comedy, Drama, History, Romance, Sport, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

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One of the key issues to be explored in our study of film is that of representation. As such, it’s fair to say that there’s an established, and largely agreed upon, understanding that film, like other media and forms of cultural expression, can reflect back to us aspects of the conditions in which we live or have lived with. Certainly, there’s scope for us to think about how British cinema has, in more or less...

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The Impact of World War Two on British Cinema »

jclarke | Tuesday December 03, 2013

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR AS, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film History, Cinema in Context, Film Industry, Censorship & Regulation, Copyright & Licensing, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Production Companies, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, In Which We Serve, The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, Genres & Case Studies, Drama, Romance, War, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

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World War Two impacted ferociously on Great Britain: cities were attacked by German bombers, air battles were fought and daily life was severely tested over the six years of conflict. It’s understandable though, if the war seems a long, long time ago to you. Cinema, however, offers us a meaningful way to reconnect with, and reflect on the event and to develop a sense of the relationship between World War Two and British...

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Spectatorship and Early Cinema Before 1917 »

jclarke | Saturday November 30, 2013

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR A2, OCR AS, Eduqas (WJEC) A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film History, Cinema in Context, Film Industry, Censorship & Regulation, Copyright & Licensing, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Production Companies, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Theory, Spectatorship Theory

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Cinema is now nearly 120 years old and it’s a magnificently broad, deep, complex and exciting subject.

It’s understandably easy to think that the way films are now is how they have always been, in terms of their technology and particularly how they organize (tell) their stories. However, this isn’t the case and so it’s important for us to be aware that all forms of cultural expression evolve across time and that they...

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Developments in 21st Century Cinema and Film (2000-Present) »

jclarke | Wednesday November 27, 2013

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR A2, OCR AS, Eduqas (WJEC) A Level, WJEC AS, WJEC A2, Film History, Cinema in Context, Film Industry, Censorship & Regulation, Copyright & Licensing, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Production Companies, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, Avatar, World Cinema, Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

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Film is technology. It’s an obvious point, and an essential one.

Film established itself as a symbol of the modern, mechanical age of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century and so it is particularly interesting to now witness how the medium is moving into the digital age. Indeed, we should perhaps talk not of new technology but of now technology because it is so quickly ever changing and evolving. In Western Europe...

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Piracy and Cinema »

nicoleponsford | Wednesday September 05, 2012

Categories: Film Industry, Copyright & Licensing, Hot Entries

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What is Piracy?

It (sadly) has nothing to do with pirates, eye-patches and parrots. Piracy can also be referred to as copyright infringement of audio-visual works. It refers to the ‘exclusive rights’ to reproduce or perform copyrighted work. Copy right means the ‘right to copy’ / reproduce. Copyright infringement can also refer to copying intellectual property without permission (written) from the copyright holder.

Intellectual Property (IP)

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What is Synergy? »

vikiwalden | Thursday November 10, 2011

Categories: Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Copyright & Licensing, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Production Companies, Hot Entries

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The basic concept of Synergy can be explained through this mathematical formula:

1+1=3

Whilst this may not make sense to mathematicians, in business it does, when we think of profit value. If you sell two separate products, for example a video game and a film, they could both do very well, giving you a profit of £200 million each.

However if the video game and film were linked, i.e. both Harry Potter projects, this is synergy because the profit value...

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Copyright & Licensing Links »

Richard Gent | Monday September 12, 2011

Categories: Film Industry, Copyright & Licensing