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Viewing entries from category: Spectatorship Theory

Teaching A Level Film with Edusites »

Barry Rainsford | Wednesday March 21, 2018

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, Eduqas (WJEC) A Level, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Films & Case Studies, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Genre, Narrative, Representation, Key Skills, Cinematography, Editing, Filming, Mise-en-Scene, Planning, Pre-Production, Reflective Analysis, New Spec, Posters, Theory, Auteur Theory, Film Theory, Queer Theory, Spectatorship Theory, Theorists

The Edusites programme of study for A Level Film has been designed to provide a Core Unit for each term to help students develop the right level of knowledge and understanding of the key critical approaches and all the framework concepts of narrative, genre, representations, and spectatorship. 

Our NEA Support Materials will focus on Making a Short Film for OCR NEA and Production for Eduqas NEA.

Edusites A Level Film Programme of Study:

  • Unit 1...

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IB Film Theory, History and Textual Analysis »

Richard Gent | Friday January 26, 2018

Categories: IB, IB FIlm, Analysis, Film History, Film Industry, Films & Case Studies, American, Hollywood Films, Non-Hollywood Films, Silent Era, World Cinema, Genres & Case Studies, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Genre, Narrative, Representation, Key Skills, New Spec, Research, Film Research, Theory, Auteur Theory, Film Theory, Queer Theory, Spectatorship Theory

So what do we need to do for students and teachers to perform brilliantly?

Our resources are a guide to producing critically autonomous students who gain a wide range of skills in the study of film and truly make the transition from film fan to film student.

Reading film

  • Examine film as an art form, studying a broad range of film texts from a variety of cultural contexts and analysing how film elements combine to create meaning.

Contextualising...

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WJEC AS/A2 Film Studies Suspension of Disbelief Believing in Make Believe »

Emily Hughes | Tuesday March 18, 2014

Categories: A Level, Eduqas (WJEC) A Level, WJEC AS, FM1, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Theory, Spectatorship Theory

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The movies: flickering images running past our eyes at 24 frames per second. They have the power to make us cry, make us sit on the edge of our seat, exhilarate and infuriate but how? The narratives that unfold in front of us are products, made up stories. The events we see on screen are just actors pretending to be other people, increasingly a lot of what we see is so devoid of reality that it is created on a computer through...

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Spectatorship and Early Cinema Before 1917 »

jclarke | Saturday November 30, 2013

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR A2, OCR AS, Eduqas (WJEC) A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film History, Cinema in Context, Film Industry, Censorship & Regulation, Copyright & Licensing, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Production Companies, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Theory, Spectatorship Theory

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Cinema is now nearly 120 years old and it’s a magnificently broad, deep, complex and exciting subject.

It’s understandably easy to think that the way films are now is how they have always been, in terms of their technology and particularly how they organize (tell) their stories. However, this isn’t the case and so it’s important for us to be aware that all forms of cultural expression evolve across time and that they...

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Spectatorship Experimental/Expanded Film: Meshes of the Afternoon & Tarnation »

Amy Charlewood | Tuesday November 19, 2013

Categories: A Level, Eduqas (WJEC) A Level, WJEC AS, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Genres & Case Studies, Avant-Garde, Cinema Verite, Documentary, Experimental, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Theory, Spectatorship Theory

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Definition and Introduction

As one might expect the term experimental cinema is difficult to define clearly and by its very nature avoids simplistic categorisation. Within the movement itself there has been frequent debate over its definition. Fred Camper discusses experimental film-makers such as Peter Kubelka and Stan Brackage who questioned titles like ‘Avant-garde’ for suggesting experimental cinema is intrinsically...

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