Secret Examiner

A Level Film

IB Film

Film Library

Codes & Conventions

Legacy Resources

Useful Materials

The Wave Case Study

jclarke | Monday March 10, 2014

Categories: GCSE, WJEC GCSE, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, The Wave, Genres & Case Studies, Drama, Thriller, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

click on image to enlarge

WJEC GCSE Film Studies Paper 2 Exploring Film Outside Hollywood: The Wave (2008 – Germany)

Introduction

Exploring films that have been produced outside of those made and distributed globally by the Hollywood film studios offers us an exciting opportunity to broaden our horizons: in terms of storytelling (the way of telling, or organizing the elements of a story), the stories themselves become of broader interest in other cultures and their cinemas. Watching films from around the world, rather than only those made by American and British film producers is an accessible and enriching way to develop a sense of the differences in how the world is understood.

In this resource we are going to focus on the film The Wave (2008). It’s a feature length film that offers us a route into thinking about a number of socially relevant subjects and particularly about education and the relationship between teacher and student.

Before we refer specifically to particular moments from The Wave, which is the film text it will be useful for us to work through a number of contextual reference points that give us a ‘big picture’ view through which to consider the film itself. In this way we are paying attention to what the film’s producers have arguably encoded the film with. In doing so, our role as a viewer is to decode the text.

Contexts

It’s perhaps an obvious point to make, but it’s an always valid one: all films manipulate audiences and this is one of the fundamental pleasures of a film and one of the key reasons that we chose to view a particular movie. It is because we want to experience a change in our condition, to ‘escape’ from what we know. That does not always mean, however, that we will watch a lavishly produced genre film. Our escape is into a state of laughter or tension, sadness, or fear or happiness. A film allows us a very specific way to do this. We might say that a film offers us a kind...


Please subscribe or log in to access the rest of this resource (including associated media).

This website offers a wealth of enriched content to help you help your students with GCSE & A Level Film. Please subscribe or log in to access this content.

The content of this site has been produced by teachers and examiners. Edusites have similar support sites for English and Media called Edusites English and Edusites Media.

If you would like more information about Edusites Film, get in touch using the contact details below.

Kind regards, Richard Gent
Edusites Ltd

[email] admin@edusites.co.uk
[telephone] 01604 847689
[fax] 01604 843220