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The Babadook Single Film Study

jclarke | Monday February 11, 2019

Categories: A Level, Films & Case Studies, Directors, Jennifer Kent, Non-Hollywood Films, The Babadook, Genres & Case Studies, Drama, Horror

YouTube link to trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htlsOf3PnGY

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Context

Cinema is always evolving and it’s exciting to witness, to explore and to understand. A film such as The Babadook is a horror / fantasy fusion that has, like films such as Pan’s Labyrinth, Get Out and Hereditary, somewhat transcended its original moment of release to become something of a landmark in contemporary horror cinema. In each of these cases, we may say that the horror that the characters are confronted by is indeed monstrous but that is not just a figment of the fantastical but instead that it derives from the return of a repressed, and all too-human sadness and sorrow.

Every film reflects the concerns of its time, the particular way of looking at the world in that culture, that society, that time. To fully understand a film, you need to know something of the era in which it was produced. As you will have already considered in your Edusites Core Units, film is very much a cultural artefact, a reflection of the society that created and watched it. Each film is influenced by all of the films that have gone before it – the collective consciousness of how we ‘look’ at a film - and will have specific conventions that link it to others of its genre, its type.

For your examination, an understanding of the film’s production and of events in the world at that time will offer perspectives on how to better view its narrative presentation and thematic concerns. More importantly, you will learn how its use of film language and film aesthetics will have been shaped (and in turn shaped) by the way that other films of its time were constructed.

Films are shaped by the contexts in which they are...


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