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Viewing entries from category: Theory

New Spec A Level Film Studies »

Barry Rainsford | Friday October 13, 2017

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, WJEC A Level, Film History, Film Industry, Films & Case Studies, American, Directors, Hollywood Films, Non-Hollywood Films, World Cinema, Genres & Case Studies, Key Concepts, Key Skills, Overviews, Theory

We are aware that some specifications are currently being accredited by Ofqual.

At Edusites we don’t like to keep our subscribers in limbo so here is Unit 1 of 6 new resources for the A Level Film Studies Specification.

These resources are flexible for the first term when you don’t have to choose which exam board you are pursuing.

Each term we provide a Core Unit, Exam Unit and NEA Unit based on the Department for Education Film Studies A Level subject content. (February 2016)

The intention of the course of study is to enable learners to demonstrate knowledge and...

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The Effective Use of Theory in Film Studies »

Antony Bateman | Friday October 16, 2015

Categories: Hot Entries, Theory, Film Theory

Life, as no doubt we have all noticed, is for the most part rather more mundane and less predictable than that and films like Chungking Express seek to capture that ‘normality’. The real messages that the film is trying to convey about Hong Kong, its people, their relationships, globalisation and the apprehension felt in the run up to the handover of Hong Kong from British to Chinese rule in 1997 is told not through the traditional narrative structure but through the visual elements such as editing, camerawork and mise-en-scene and through the cacophony of sounds...

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Happy Together (Hong Kong 1997) Case Study »

James Clarke | Tuesday October 07, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section C: Single Film Critical Study, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Films & Case Studies, World Cinema, Happy Together, Genres & Case Studies, Drama, Romance, Hot Entries, Theory, Auteur Theory, Queer Theory

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FM4: Varieties of Film Experience – Issues and Debates Section C: Single Film – Critical Study

Introduction

Happy Together is a feature film directed by Wong Kar-wai. It was released in 1997, the year that Hong Kong’s governance from Britain ended and governance from China began. The fact that Happy Together begins with passports being stamped might well resonate with Hong Kong audiences particularly with when the film was released. We might suggest that a passport is a very tangible symbol of national identity. The film is encoded...[ read full article ] »


Recommended A2 Film Studies Theorists »

Rob Miller | Monday September 15, 2014

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR A2, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM3, FM4, Section A: World Cinema, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Section C: Single Film Critical Study, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Representation, Theory, Theorists

The following theorists represent a selection of film theorists (from many) whose work can be cited in both A Level Film Studies coursework and external assessment, for both WJEC and OCR. For example, OCR Film Studies Section B F633 suggests: “candidates are encouraged to engage with critical frameworks relevant to the topic area” e.g. Film Regulation, Authorship and Film and Audience Experience while WJEC Film Studies FM4 states that students should: “apply key concepts and critical approaches gained throughout the course to explore film in a synoptic manner”.

In...

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WJEC A2 Film Studies FM4 Section A World Cinema Bollywood A Grade Exemplar »

Rob Miller | Wednesday September 03, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section A: World Cinema, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, World Cinema, Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge, Shree 420, Genres & Case Studies, Bollywood, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Theory, Auteur Theory

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By comparing the cinematic styles used in the films you have studied for this topic, is it possible to identify a distinctive ‘National Cinema’?

Indian cinema means different things to different people and there are a lot of different cinematic styles originating from the Indian subcontinent. Stereotypically, when western audiences without cultural capital or knowledge think of Indian films the iconic name ‘Bollywood’ comes to mind, or less widely known outside of India, as Hindi films. Bollywood films have come to represent a national...

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WJEC AS/A2 Film Studies Suspension of Disbelief Believing in Make Believe »

Emily Hughes | Tuesday March 18, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM1, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Theory, Spectatorship Theory

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The movies: flickering images running past our eyes at 24 frames per second. They have the power to make us cry, make us sit on the edge of our seat, exhilarate and infuriate but how? The narratives that unfold in front of us are products, made up stories. The events we see on screen are just actors pretending to be other people, increasingly a lot of what we see is so devoid of reality that it is created on a computer through CGI, it’s all just make believe. So how then, does cinema make us believe in the worlds it crafts and care about the...

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Julie Christie: British Film and Stars »

James Clarke | Tuesday February 11, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section B: British Film Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Production Companies, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Genres & Case Studies, British Film, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Theory, Film Theory

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While we often first think and refer to contemporary examples of film stars when we study film, it’s useful and valuable to consider film stars whose work has featured across several decades. More specifically for us as British audiences, it’s of particular interest to consider British film stars both in terms of the interest of their performances, and also in terms of how these performances offer representations of national identity and gender in combination. Stars are media texts that are encoded and can be decoded for their meanings and...

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Spectatorship and Early Cinema Before 1917 »

James Clarke | Saturday November 30, 2013

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR A2, OCR AS, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film History, Cinema in Context, Film Industry, Censorship & Regulation, Copyright & Licensing, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Production Companies, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Theory, Spectatorship Theory

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Cinema is now nearly 120 years old and it’s a magnificently broad, deep, complex and exciting subject.

It’s understandably easy to think that the way films are now is how they have always been, in terms of their technology and particularly how they organize (tell) their stories. However, this isn’t the case and so it’s important for us to be aware that all forms of cultural expression evolve across time and that they are subject to many influences, intended or not. Understanding how cinema began might, in fact, give us some feeling for...

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Spectatorship Experimental/Expanded Film: Meshes of the Afternoon & Tarnation »

Amy Charlewood | Tuesday November 19, 2013

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Genres & Case Studies, Avant-Garde, Cinéma Vérité, Documentary, Experimental, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Theory, Spectatorship Theory

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Definition and Introduction

As one might expect the term experimental cinema is difficult to define clearly and by its very nature avoids simplistic categorisation. Within the movement itself there has been frequent debate over its definition. Fred Camper discusses experimental film-makers such as Peter Kubelka and Stan Brackage who questioned titles like ‘Avant-garde’ for suggesting experimental cinema is intrinsically European, ‘different cinema’ was used for a while but rejected for sounding like it’s at odds with ‘normal cinema’ and even...

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Authorship in Contemporary Cinema: The Films of Danny Boyle and Tim Burton »

James Clarke | Tuesday November 19, 2013

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR A2, OCR AS, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, WJEC A2, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Directors, Danny Boyle, Tim Burton, Hot Entries, Theory, Auteur Theory, Film Theory

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As we know, there are a fascinating range of ways in which to explore what cinema is; for example: how it achieves its impact on an audience, how technology informs creative choices and how a particular film can tell us something of the culture that produced it. These are all ways of understanding the relationship between text and context. However, the concept that remains perhaps most popular, accessible and fundamental to our thinking about cinema, perhaps because it humanizes a very technical and technological medium, is that of film...

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World Cinema Topics: Empowering Women - Volver (2006) and Amores Perros (2000) »

Amy Charlewood | Monday February 04, 2013

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section A: World Cinema, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, World Cinema, Amores Perros, Volver, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Theory, Film Theory

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It is important to firstly consider the context of this unit as an exploration of world cinema. World cinema is difficult to define; with most definitions reverting to that it can be defined simply as any cinema outside of the globally dominant industry of Hollywood or any non English language cinema. Often discussed as an alternative to Hollywood’s ‘dream factory’, World cinema tends to be perceived as possessing certain features offering an insight into another country’s culture, a low budget gritty representation of real life or having more artistic merit than...

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Ewan McGregor: British Film and Stars »

James Clarke | Thursday December 20, 2012

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section B: British Film Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Production Companies, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Trainspotting, Genres & Case Studies, British Film, Social Realism, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Theory, Film Theory

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Ewan McGregor is a major British film star who has appeared in a wide range of films that have been released globally since 1994. His career has combined performances in a range of lower budgeted feature films and work in highly budgeted, event films released by the major film studios. Over the course of almost twenty years McGregor has appeared in nearly fifty films.

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Professionally trained as an actor at London’s Guildhall, McGregor hails from Scotland and the narrative of his career progression from provincial Scotland to being an internationally recognized film star...

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Film Theory and Language »

Nicole Ponsford | Thursday August 23, 2012

Categories: GCSE, A Level, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Film Language, Theory, Film Theory

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Apparatus Film Theory

‘Apparatus’ is another word for the means in which a specific production is created. In the case of film / cinema, the film projector and the screen. Apparatus Theory is a model of spectatorship and institutions. It argues that cinema is ideological (based on ideas) because the films are created to represent reality. This means that because film is created to illustrate different ideas, everything has meaning - from the camerawork to the editing. It argues that ideology is not imposed on cinema, but is part of its nature (through the viewer) and it...

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Postcolonialism & Cultural Imperalism »

Richard Gent | Wednesday April 25, 2012

Categories: Analysis, Film Analysis, Micro Analysis, Shot Analysis, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Representation, Theory, Film Theory

We had an enquiry recently about Postmodernism which led to some productive responses. Ellen Grundy’s approach involved:

(L)ooking at representation and postcolonialism (as follows):

A research task on Gurinder Chadha and her films. How do her life and the themes of her films suggest a post colonial identity? For example Bend it like Beckham as a coming together of different ethnicities / cultures.

The classic clip of going for an ‘English’ in Goodness Gracious Me that turns representation on its head. Useful for debating how different races are treated in a postcolonial /...

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Understanding Auteur Theory »

Viki Walden | Thursday November 17, 2011

Categories: A Level, Analysis, Film Analysis, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Film Language, Theory, Film Theory

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What is Auteur Theory?

There are various debates underlining the existence of Auteurs; how to define an “Auteur” has been much theorized. The original concept took birth in the pages of the Cahiers du Cinema in the 1950s, particularly voiced by French Nouvelle Vague filmmaker, Francois Truffaut.

Truffaut was both very critical of the trend in French cinema to identify the author as the screenwriter and very aware of both his, and his other Nouvelle Vague counterparts’ signature styles. In 1954 Truffaut wrote an essay entitled A Certain Tendency in French Cinema, in...

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