FilmEdu

Current Resources

Onsite Consultancy

Workshops & CPD

Useful Materials

Gallery

Gallery

Viewing entries from category: Section C: US Film Comparative Study

WJEC AS Film Studies FM2 US Cinema Comparative Study: Dirty Harry and Gran Torino »

Rob Miller | Wednesday September 09, 2015

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section C: US Film Comparative Study, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, American, Directors, Clint Eastwood, Don Siegel, Hollywood Films, Dirty Harry, Gran Torino, Genres & Case Studies, Action, Action Thriller, Drama, Thriller, Western, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Genre, Narrative, Representation

  • Dirty Harry (1971, Don Siegel)
  • Gran Torino (2008, Clint Eastwood)

Centres can choose from a range of different American film texts: the three main areas of study are Messages, Themes and Values, Narrative and Genre, Representation of Time and Place (often linked to messages and values) and Representation of Character. You can compare in Section B but in Section C you must. The above choice of texts reflects films belonging to the same genre but it is very possible to explore two films that encode similar messages and themes from different genres and time periods. Both...

[ read full article ] »

WJEC AS Film Studies FM2 US Cinema Comparative Study: Taxi Driver and No Country for Old Men »

Rob Miller | Monday September 07, 2015

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section C: US Film Comparative Study, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, American, No Country for Old Men, Hollywood Films, Taxi Driver, Genres & Case Studies, Crime, Drama, Thriller, Hot Entries

FM2 British and American Film Section C: US Cinema Comparative Study

For further details of assessment requirements and past Section C exam questions, please go to FilmEdu’s Gilda (1946) and L.A Confidential (1997) Comparative Case Study  and FilmEdu’s Minority Report and Blade Runner Comparative Study for other comparison resources.

Taxi Driver

Like No Country for Old Men, Taxi Driver is a film about nihilism – with 31 years between them both films have characters that reject underpinning established rules of law in pursuit of an ultimate individualism. Both films...

[ read full article ] »

WJEC AS Film Studies FM2 US Cinema Comparative Study: Goodfellas and American Gangster »

Rob Miller | Monday September 07, 2015

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section C: US Film Comparative Study, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, American, Directors, Martin Scorsese, Ridley Scott, Hollywood Films, American Gangster, Goodfellas, Genres & Case Studies, Crime, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Genre, Narrative, Representation

  • Goodfellas (1990, Martin Scorsese)
  • American Gangster (2007, Ridley Scott)

Centres can choose from a range of different American film texts. The three main areas of study are Messages, Themes and Values, Narrative and Genre, Representation of Time and Place (often linked to Messages and Values) and Representation of Character. You can compare in Section B but in Section C you must. The above choice of texts reflects films belonging to the same genre but it is very possible to explore two films that encode similar messages and themes from different genres and time periods....

[ read full article ] »

WJEC AS FM2 British & American Film Producers and Audiences Resource Items »

Rob Miller | Wednesday October 08, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM1, FM2, Section B: British Film Topics, Section C: US Film Comparative Study, Film Industry, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Genres & Case Studies, British Film, Hot Entries

FM2: British and American Film ‘How to Respond to Section A - Producers and Audiences: Resource Items’

This resource examines approaches to Section A of FM2 in terms of areas of questioning but specifically, how to respond to the range of stimulus WJEC could use, and expect students to refer to in Part A and Part B of the resource items.

The section title, ‘Producers and Audiences’ is important in letting students know the type of response expected in the exam – an equal engagement with both film producers and film audience is expected in both questions (there will...

[ read full article ] »

WJEC AS Film Studies FM2 US Cinema Comparative Study: Minority Report and Blade Runner »

Rob Miller | Monday October 06, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section C: US Film Comparative Study, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Films & Case Studies, American, Blade Runner, Hollywood Films, Minority Report, Genres & Case Studies, Action, Mystery, Science Fiction, Thriller, Hot Entries

Introduction

One of the most interesting ways to engage with genre is to select two films from the same genre and compare and contrast them. Critically, select two films produced in significantly different time periods and places - by doing this kind of analytical exercise we’re able to go some distance in identifying some of the ways in which a genre evolves.

Science fiction film certainly seems to offer a particularly rich case study in terms of what kinds of ideas texts can be encoded with how we, as the audience (in our own particular times and places) can then...

[ read full article ] »

WJEC AS Film Studies FM2 US Cinema Comparative Study: Gilda and L.A.Confidential »

Rob Miller | Tuesday September 23, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section C: US Film Comparative Study, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, American, L.A Confidential, Hollywood Films, Gilda, Genres & Case Studies, Crime, Drama, Film Noir, Mystery, Romance, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Representation

Introduction

In this section of the exam you will get a choice of one question from two – an absolute must is that you compare and contrast two films, either from the same genre or that both deal with a specific theme. Genre, narrative and representation are key areas of study - see below examples of past questions:

  1. How far do the American films you have studied convey key themes in similar ways?
  2. How far is the representation of characters in the American films you have studied influenced by the times in which the films were made?
  3. Discuss some of the similarities and...
[ read full article ] »