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Viewing entries from category: Mystery

Vertigo Single Film Study »

Graham Panton | Saturday September 02, 2017

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, American, Directors, Alfred Hitchcock, Hollywood Films, Vertigo, Genres & Case Studies, Mystery, Romance, Thriller

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EDUQAS Film Studies Paper 1

Section A: Hollywood 1930-1990
Component Group 1: Hollywood 1930-1960

These tasks require you study all films with particular reference to responding to questions in the key areas:

  • Film Language
  • Film Meaning
  • Film Context

And...

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WJEC AS Film Studies FM2 US Cinema Comparative Study: Minority Report and Blade Runner »

Rob Miller | Monday October 06, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section C: US Film Comparative Study, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Film Distribution, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Films & Case Studies, American, Blade Runner, Hollywood Films, Minority Report, Genres & Case Studies, Action, Mystery, Science Fiction, Thriller, Hot Entries

Introduction

One of the most interesting ways to engage with genre is to select two films from the same genre and compare and contrast them. Critically, select two films produced in significantly different time periods and places - by doing this kind of analytical exercise we’re able to go some distance in identifying some of the ways in which a genre evolves.

Science fiction film certainly seems to offer a particularly rich case study in terms of what kinds of ideas texts can be encoded with how we, as the audience (in our own particular times and places) can then...

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WJEC AS Film Studies FM2 US Cinema Comparative Study: Gilda and L.A.Confidential »

Rob Miller | Tuesday September 23, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, FM2, Section C: US Film Comparative Study, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, American, L.A Confidential, Hollywood Films, Gilda, Genres & Case Studies, Crime, Drama, Film Noir, Mystery, Romance, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Representation

Introduction

In this section of the exam you will get a choice of one question from two – an absolute must is that you compare and contrast two films, either from the same genre or that both deal with a specific theme. Genre, narrative and representation are key areas of study - see below examples of past questions:

  1. How far do the American films you have studied convey key themes in similar ways?
  2. How far is the representation of characters in the American films you have studied influenced by the times in which the films were made?
  3. Discuss some of the similarities and...
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Vertigo (Hitchcock 1958) Case Study »

James Clarke | Monday August 18, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section C: Single Film Critical Study, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film Industry, Film Marketing, Film Publicity, Film Promotion, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, Vertigo, Genres & Case Studies, Mystery, Romance, Thriller, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation

click on image to enlarge

Understanding the relationship between the micro and the macro elements of a film is an essential part of our analysis of movies. Every shot, every sound accumulates to form the expression of an idea. Thinking about movies in this way might prompt us to acknowledge that a camera move for example, can express a character’s psychology, sometimes more forcefully and memorably than a line of dialogue could ever do. In the opening scene of Vertigo (1958) as the film’s protagonist Scottie looks down from a great height during a chase, a camera move...

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AS OCR Film Studies: Contemporary English Language Film »

Nicole Ponsford | Tuesday September 11, 2012

Categories: A Level, OCR A Level, OCR AS, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Hot Fuzz, The Woman in Black, Genres & Case Studies, Action, British Film, Comedy, Drama, Horror, Independent, Mystery, Thriller, Hot Entries

image

In both the exam and in the coursework, candidates will be asked to study English Language Texts. They are NOT able to study the same texts for both sections and will prepare for this in different ways. For example, the coursework will act as a catalyst for their creative work in their portfolios. In the exam, students will have part of a two hour exam to answer a specific (unseen) question on an aspect of the film.

Both the coursework and examination texts will have shared aspects. This is mainly the understanding of both the micro and macro features of a text. It is...

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