FilmEdu

Current Resources

Onsite Consultancy

Workshops & CPD

Useful Materials

Gallery

Gallery

Viewing entries from category: Mock Exams

GCSE Film Studies Exemplar Responses 2013/14 »

Rob Miller | Wednesday April 16, 2014

Categories: GCSE, WJEC GCSE, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, X-Men, Non-Hollywood Films, Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, The Devil's Backbone, Genres & Case Studies, Superhero, Hot Entries, Mock Exams, GCSE Mock Exams

image

Associated Resources

  • WJEC GCSE Film Studies Mock Exam Paper 1 A Grade Response 2013.docx
  • WJEC GCSE Film Studies Paper 2 A-B Exemplar The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas.docx
  • WJEC GCSE Film Studies Mock Exam Paper 2 A Grade Response 2013.docx
  • WJEC GCSE Film Studies Mock Exam Paper 2 D-C Grade Response 2013.docx
  • WJEC GCSE Film Studies Paper 2 Non Hollywood Exemplars
  • WJEC GCSE Film Studies Paper 1 A-B Grade Response Summer 2014.docx



WJEC A2 Film Studies FM4 Section B Spectatorship Documentaries Exemplar »

Karen Ardouin | Monday June 10, 2013

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Fahrenheit 9/11, Grizzly Man, Marley, Senna, Super Size Me, Touching The Void, We Are The Lambeth Boys, Genres & Case Studies, Adventure, Biography, Comedy, Documentary, Drama, History, Independent, Music, Sport, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Mock Exams, A Level Mock Exams

click on image to enlarge

With reference to the films you have studied for this topic, how far can it be said that different kinds of documentaries offer different kinds of spectator experiences?

The spectator experience is dependent on a number of factors including environment of reception for example (where it is seen) and specifically purpose, whether to entertain, inform, educate or persuade. Documentaries are diverse in content and can suggest degrees of realism. Mediated content is often apparent in terms of the selection and construction of material or a wholly...

[ read full article ] »

WJEC A2 Film Studies FM4 Section B Spectatorship Fahrenheit 9/11 Kurt and Courtney Exemplar »

Karen Ardouin | Monday June 10, 2013

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Bowling For Columbine, Fahrenheit 9/11, Kurt & Courtney, Genres & Case Studies, Biography, Documentary, History, Music, War, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Mock Exams, A Level Mock Exams

click on image to enlarge

‘A common experience for the spectator when watching a documentary is to be manipulated by the filmmakers’. How far do you agree with this statement? (35)

Generally, documentaries are created in order to impart information and, in the main, to persuade the audience into believing a particular viewpoint. The contract between audience and filmmaker is considered along with the code of ethics with regard to documenting the real. For example, there are questions around the time and space created within the story and the structure and chronology of...

[ read full article ] »

GCSE Film Studies Mock Exams 2013 »

Rob Miller | Wednesday January 09, 2013

Categories: GCSE, WJEC GCSE, Films & Case Studies, Hollywood Films, X-Men, Non-Hollywood Films, Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, Genres & Case Studies, Superhero, Hot Entries, Mock Exams, GCSE Mock Exams

image

Associated Resources

  • WJEC GCSE Film Sudies Mock Exam Paper 1 2013.docx
  • WJEC GCSE Film Studies Mock Exam Paper 2 2013.docx

 




GCSE Film Studies Mock Mark Schemes 2013 »

Rob Miller | Wednesday January 09, 2013

Categories: GCSE, WJEC GCSE, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, Genres & Case Studies, Superhero, Hot Entries, Mock Exams, GCSE Mock Exams

image

Associated Resources

  • WJEC GCSE Film Studies Paper 1 Mark Scheme 2013.docx
  • WJEC GCSE Film Studies Paper 2 Mark Scheme 2013.docx



Breaking Down The Mock Exam | Paper 1 Superhero Film »

Nicole Ponsford | Wednesday October 12, 2011

Categories: GCSE, Analysis, Film Analysis, Genres & Case Studies, Superhero, Hot Entries, Mock Exams, GCSE Mock Exams

Top Tips for Students

1. Always read all the questions and follow the instructions to the letter!

2. In advance, consider how much time you have for each section. Try to keep to this. Always give yourself 5-8 minutes at the end for checking work over. If you are working and cannot answer a question, move on and come back to it.

3. Look at the amount of marks available. You may be able to write bullet point answers for some questions, but need to write a longer and more detailed response for others.

4. ALWAYS USE FILM LANGUAGE as much as you can. This shows the examiner...

[ read full article ] »

Breaking Down The Mock Exam | Paper 2 Non-Hollywood Film »

Nicole Ponsford | Monday September 19, 2011

Categories: GCSE, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Genres & Case Studies, Independent, Hot Entries, Mock Exams, GCSE Mock Exams

Top Tips for Students

1. Always read all the questions and follow the instructions to the letter!

2. In advance, consider how much time you have for each section. Try to keep to this. Always give yourself 5-8 minutes at the end for checking work over. If you are working and cannot answer a question, move on and come back to it.

3. Look at the amount of marks available. You may be able to write bullet point answers for some questions, but need to write a longer and more detailed response for others. If, like Question 1a, it says briefly then be brief. You do not have to...

[ read full article ] »

Breaking Down The Mock Exam | Paper 1 Disaster Film »

Nicole Ponsford | Monday September 19, 2011

Categories: GCSE, Analysis, Film Analysis, Genres & Case Studies, Disaster, Hot Entries, Mock Exams, GCSE Mock Exams

Top Tips for Students

1. Always read all the questions and follow the instructions to the letter!

2. In advance, consider how much time you have for each section. Try to keep to this. Always give yourself 5-8 minutes at the end for checking work over. If you are working and cannot answer a question, move on and come back to it.

3. Look at the amount of marks available. You may be able to write bullet point answers for some questions, but need to write a longer and more detailed response for others.

4. ALWAYS USE FILM LANGUAGE as much as you can. This shows the examiner...

[ read full article ] »