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Viewing entries from category: Documentary

Documentary and Spectatorship Workshop »

Richard Gent | Wednesday September 24, 2014

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Genres & Case Studies, Documentary, Hot Entries

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Documentary, of all genres has a profound impact on spectatorship. This dedicated, interactive WJEC A2 Film Studies Section B: Spectatorship topic explores historical and contemporary genre pieces from Vertov’s Man With a Movie Camera through to Senna, Grizzly Man and Marley ensuring that key theories e.g. the work of Dr Bill Nichols are incorporated. It is expected centres will inform Edusites Film of their chosen texts so the session can be bespoke to their needs.

Cost

  • Half Day (3 Hours Contact Time): costs from £300
  • Full Day (6 Hours...
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Spectatorship Experimental/Expanded Film: Meshes of the Afternoon & Tarnation »

Amy Charlewood | Tuesday November 19, 2013

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC AS, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Genres & Case Studies, Avant-Garde, Cinéma Vérité, Documentary, Experimental, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Theory, Spectatorship Theory

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Definition and Introduction

As one might expect the term experimental cinema is difficult to define clearly and by its very nature avoids simplistic categorisation. Within the movement itself there has been frequent debate over its definition. Fred Camper discusses experimental film-makers such as Peter Kubelka and Stan Brackage who questioned titles like ‘Avant-garde’ for suggesting experimental cinema is intrinsically European, ‘different cinema’ was used for a while but rejected for sounding like it’s at odds with ‘normal cinema’ and even...

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WJEC A2 Film Studies FM4 Section B Spectatorship Documentaries Exemplar »

Karen Ardouin | Monday June 10, 2013

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Fahrenheit 9/11, Grizzly Man, Marley, Senna, Super Size Me, Touching The Void, We Are The Lambeth Boys, Genres & Case Studies, Adventure, Biography, Comedy, Documentary, Drama, History, Independent, Music, Sport, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Mock Exams, A Level Mock Exams

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With reference to the films you have studied for this topic, how far can it be said that different kinds of documentaries offer different kinds of spectator experiences?

The spectator experience is dependent on a number of factors including environment of reception for example (where it is seen) and specifically purpose, whether to entertain, inform, educate or persuade. Documentaries are diverse in content and can suggest degrees of realism. Mediated content is often apparent in terms of the selection and construction of material or a wholly...

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WJEC A2 Film Studies FM4 Section B Spectatorship Fahrenheit 9/11 Kurt and Courtney Exemplar »

Karen Ardouin | Monday June 10, 2013

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section B: Spectatorship Topics, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Bowling For Columbine, Fahrenheit 9/11, Kurt & Courtney, Genres & Case Studies, Biography, Documentary, History, Music, War, Hot Entries, Key Concepts, Audience, Film Language, Representation, Mock Exams, A Level Mock Exams

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‘A common experience for the spectator when watching a documentary is to be manipulated by the filmmakers’. How far do you agree with this statement? (35)

Generally, documentaries are created in order to impart information and, in the main, to persuade the audience into believing a particular viewpoint. The contract between audience and filmmaker is considered along with the code of ethics with regard to documenting the real. For example, there are questions around the time and space created within the story and the structure and chronology of...

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International Film Styles: 1920s Soviet Cinema »

James Clarke | Friday March 08, 2013

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section A: World Cinema, Analysis, Film Analysis, Film History, Film Industry, Film Distribution, Production Companies, Films & Case Studies, World Cinema, Battleship Potemkin, Man With A Movie Camera, Genres & Case Studies, Documentary, Realism, Social Realism, Soviet Montage

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Cinema is always evolving.

The constantly changing quality of film styles is exciting and since the beginnings of film history many nations around the world have developed their own distinct cinematic style and this continues today in the twenty-first century.

During the early part of the twentieth century one country that contributed very significantly to the development of early cinema, was Russia and now, in 2013, almost a century later, the particular film style that emerged from Russia continues to be an essential stylistic approach that...

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Documentary Definitions »

Rob Miller | Thursday November 10, 2011

Categories: A Level, Analysis, Film Analysis, Dictionary, Media & Film Studies Dictionary, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Super Size Me, World Cinema, Man With A Movie Camera, Genres & Case Studies, Documentary, Hot Entries

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Realism: The ‘kind’ of reality produced by a media text

Mediation: The process whereby media texts select and construct the world through different techniques

Documentary encodes versions of reality that are mediated into our individual context. Realism is a term that does not always apply to what is actually real, but to degrees of realism and audiences’ expectations of reality.

Documentary Modes of Representation

In “Representing Reality, Issues and Concepts in Documentary”, Bill Nichols 1991 (Indiana University Press) argues there are four documentary modes...

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Documentary Codes & Conventions »

Rob Miller | Thursday November 10, 2011

Categories: Analysis, Film Analysis, Genres & Case Studies, Documentary, Hot Entries

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Below is a list of conventions applied to Documentary film making – it must be remembered that not all conventions apply to all film texts:

  • Hand held Camera -  encoding realism and ‘truth’
  • Narrative Voice Over -  leading the audience into a preferred reading
  • Vox Pops and Interviews with experts / witnesses / participants
  • Often a shorter running time than non-fiction feature films
  • Intercutting / Parallel Editing linking key scenes
  • Use of Archive footage to support filmed scenes
  • Surveillance (information) decoded by audience (e.g. about McDonalds in Supersize Me)
  • ...
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Supersize Me Case Study »

Rob Miller | Tuesday November 01, 2011

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, Non-Hollywood Films, Super Size Me, Genres & Case Studies, Documentary

Spectatorship and Documentary

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Synopsis and Character Profiles

Supersize Me is a documentary by independent film maker, Morgan Spurlock, about Spurlock himself spending 30 days in sequence, in 2003, eating only McDonalds food, three times a day with the ensuing affect on his health – the title of film reflects his pledge of having to eat a Supersize meal (the largest on the menu) if asked. The film explores the fast food giant’s corporate influence, and lack of nutrition in its products, with the subjective view encoded by the Documentary make that their only priority is...

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Man with a Movie Camera Case Study »

Rob Miller | Tuesday November 01, 2011

Categories: A Level, WJEC A Level, WJEC A2, FM4, Section A: World Cinema, Analysis, Film Analysis, Films & Case Studies, World Cinema, Man With A Movie Camera, Genres & Case Studies, Classic, Documentary, Independent, Silent

Spectatorship and Documentary

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Synopsis and Character Profiles

Man with a Movie Camera is an innovative silent 1929 Documentary, set in a number of cities in the Soviet Union, including Odessa (near where Eisenstein shot the iconic Odessa Steps sequence in Battleship Potemkin). Fundamentally, and on a manifest level, it is about a day in the life of a city and audiences are introduced to a city literally waking up – individuals washing and bathing, Tram Sheds opening, tramps waking up on park benches and men and women interacting with the machinery of modern life.

The...

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